GNU Licence - can I sell what I create with blender?

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stinkypete
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GNU Licence - can I sell what I create with blender?

Post by stinkypete » Sat Oct 04, 2003 1:33 am

I plan on using blender as an education tool so do not plan to sell anything I create. But I was wondering whether anything that is created using blender is still subject to the GNU licence agreement?

- Peter

:?:

dittohead
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Post by dittohead » Sat Oct 04, 2003 2:20 am

The GNU license only applies to the code, and the binaries of blender. The art that you output from the code/binaries is your intellectual property.

The only way you can "sell" blender is by selling the service to distribute blender. GNU licensed apps require that any code modifications be made availible to the public through some free means, mostly over the net. GNU code is international public property.

Anything that is created through GNUed code (like art through blender, books through openoffice, or magazines made with a layout app) can be sold.

The output from a GNU app IS NOT under the GNU license, unless the output is classified as GNUed code, which blender output is not.
dittohead

stinkypete
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Post by stinkypete » Wed Oct 08, 2003 10:26 am

Thanks for this, I was just more concerned about when you "publish", you will obviously generate an executable with the blender game engine in. I therefore assume that blender.org do not see this created binary as, in part their's?

Which sort of leads me onto another question. If when an executable is made, is it allowed to change the icon, say by editing the resources in the exe? Or is this prohibited?

Yet another question....

When I save the runtime the exe of a blank project the size is about 1.5 Mb is this the size of the engine? If so is it possible to get this as a dynamic runtime so I can reduce what I distribute? Or would this get into hairy licence issues about distributing the engine as a dll ?

Sorry about all these questions, just that blender is so fantastic is appears 'too good to be true'

Thanks

Peter

matt_e
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Post by matt_e » Wed Oct 08, 2003 12:18 pm

dittohead wrote:The GNU license only applies to the code, and the binaries of blender. The art that you output from the code/binaries is your intellectual property.
Yup, that's absolutely correct.
The only way you can "sell" blender is by selling the service to distribute blender. GNU licensed apps require that any code modifications be made availible to the public through some free means, mostly over the net. GNU code is international public property.
Actually it's perfectly fine to sell GNU/GPL code. It's even here in the GPL FAQ. The main thrust of the GPL is that if you get the binaries by some means, you must also get the source too, and be able to freely re-distribute it. GNU code is still under copyright of the original authors, not public property - that's how the same code can be offered to different people under different licenses, as it's the copyright holder that decides how and under what conditions their work is distributed.

Cheers

chimera
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owow

Post by chimera » Wed Oct 08, 2003 1:56 pm

this thread led me to the question... what about the music put into a movie or whatever?

I know heard about this stuff (not really sure about):
  • a sample (15sec) is allowed
    there is "free" music available
    you can use the music, unless you dont distribute it
questions I got:
  • as an example. I want to use acdc - highway to hell :). where can I ask for?
    is there a page where you can "buy" music for our purposes?
    what if I use a commercial track? and they catch me? (I'm not thinking of this)
thx for the answers... cu

ilac
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Re: owow

Post by ilac » Thu Oct 09, 2003 12:44 am

chimera wrote: questions I got:
  • as an example. I want to use acdc - highway to hell :). where can I ask for?
I think I can answer with respect to film. I believe it should be similar for music too.

the way that normally works is that you have to find the legal representitive(distributer) of the material in question in your area (country) and pay licence permits, royalties etc. to them. Distributing(showing etc) licenses also vary for format - at least I know that they do for film. For example one company can own rights for 16mm and 35mm ( and therefore you have to pay them to commercially project a 35mm or 16mm) and the a different company would own rights to video and dvd. Cost of such licenses/permits vary according to intended use. Educational vs commecial, one off vs repeated, local vs international etc etc.
chimera wrote: is there a page where you can "buy" music for our purposes?
Then there are also libraries of royalty free stuff - music samples, loops, effects, pics, footage, clip-art etc. If you don't need that specific latest hit song or old classical one but just want a 'rock tune' or a 'jazz tune' etc then buy royalty free stuff.
chimera wrote: what if I use a commercial track? and they catch me? (I'm not thinking of this)
You get sued and get charged for damages, permits etc etc. according to what you used the stuff for. Normally all starts wth a letter from their lawyers...

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