Promoting Blender, could use a hand.

The interface, modeling, 3d editing tools, import/export, feature requests, etc

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unsettlingsilence
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Promoting Blender, could use a hand.

Post by unsettlingsilence » Fri Feb 17, 2006 5:03 am

I am a computer teacher at an elementary school. I found Blender October of last year. Since then I have integrated blender into my curriculum and it is helping our kids to better learn geometry, math, and science. They are currently finishing up a lesson in which they have modeled the solar system. I would also like to use the game engine to create educational games. I have the blender 2.3 guide, and the gamekit, and am doing my best to absorb as much as I can as fast as I can. I am also working on learning to program in python.
Ok, here is my question, or request. One of my student's father is a fire fighter. I was talking to him and mentioned blender. I asked if maybe they could use it to create 3d scenarios for training purposes, and offered to introduce them to the program. They seem very interested. What I was wondering was if there was some script or setting in blender that would let me see the length and or position of a mesh/object in relation to a fixed point just by selecting it. For example, it would be useful to be able to create a wall, be it a plane, or a face in between vertices, and know that it is 4 in length or distance from point to point, and that those vertices are in (x, y, z) position from a fixed median point. It would be useful to know that a wall you have modeled is supposed to be 12 meters as opposed to another surface, which was modeled to be 5 meters in comparison. You could then, in theory follow a schematic of a real building and more easily get it right the first time. If you made a mistake, you could easily just check your measurements and positions.
If there is a way to display this I would like to know before I go and do my presentation. If not, it would be great for teaching (x, y, z) coordinates and plotting, measurements, ECT...

Big thanks to everyone who is putting all that hard work into blender. I can't thank you guys enough!!
Education is not like a hamburger.
When you share it, you end up with more not less.

Ryz
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Post by Ryz » Fri Feb 17, 2006 7:14 am

You have to keep in mind what value you attribute to the generic blender unit. Which means that the grid represents that certain scale, i.e. it could represent a metre, centimetre, an inch or a foot, whatever you like.

As for that wall, note the difference in sizing a piece while in Object or Edit Mode. Say you created a fresh cube (soon to be a wall), you start of in Edit Mode. Use the TAB key to exit to Object mode. Now press the NKEY for information on the selected object and note the scale. 1 for x, y and z.

If you'd use the scale command now, in object mode, the information would be reflected for that object using the N command (scale changes).

Now say, you created that cube and didn't go to Object Mode but starting resizing in Edit Mode (4 times as wide, 6 times as high, and 10 times as deep, for instance). Now go back to object mode and to the information panel (N). You'll see the object is still 1 for x, y, z.

So take that into account while trying to build pieces that need to conform to some scale. There is mesh sizing AND object sizing.

Hope this helps!

unsettlingsilence
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Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 1:38 am
Location: New Mexico, USA

Post by unsettlingsilence » Fri Feb 17, 2006 9:12 pm

Ok! I hadn't ever used the N Key (Transformation Properties) before. That definitely helps. Thanks.
Education is not like a hamburger.
When you share it, you end up with more not less.

oyster
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Post by oyster » Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:51 am

If you visit forum www.elysium.com, you can get more informations for normal user. The info on this forum is more useful for developer other than for user. :)

sten
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Joined: Sun Oct 13, 2002 7:47 pm

Post by sten » Sat Feb 18, 2006 10:14 am

oyster wrote:If you visit forum www.elysium.com, you can get more informations for normal user. The info on this forum is more useful for developer other than for user. :)
that would be www.elysiun.com if spelled correct :)

teachtech
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Post by teachtech » Sun Feb 19, 2006 3:50 am

Nice to hear about Blender in the schools. I'm in the final stages of updating my classroom Blender Basics Classroom book for 2.41 and should have it up on my site this week. I use it at the high school level in our drafting and design classes. Maybe it can be of help for the basics.

unsettlingsilence
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Post by unsettlingsilence » Fri Feb 24, 2006 5:09 am

Awesome, thanks! Great book Jim. I was sure there had to be other educators using blender, but I hadn't heard of any. I'm just winging it, but so far it's going really well.
I think it would be nice to have a website, or section in the forums perhaps dedicated to the use Blender as it relates to education. It would be a great place for lesson plans, and ideas as well as would promote blender's amazing features to a whole new community. Maybe you already know of one, but such a space would be excellent for colaboration.
I also think it would be great for instance to use such a site to design open source games around curriculums and post them there. This would also promote the site and, with many different educators contributing to such efforts, improve the quality of the work. Ideas could even be given as challenges to the members of the Blender community.

I'll end there since this is probably not the right place for this post.

Thanks again for all the help guys.
Education is not like a hamburger.
When you share it, you end up with more not less.

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